Surrounded by idiots – book review

Feel like you’re constantly surrounded by idiots? Want to learn valuable behavioural skills that can help you navigate the world of work? Surrounded by idiots is an easy to understand tool that teaches you how to understand those who cannot be understood.

This 260+ paged, non-fiction read was written by Thomas Erikson, a Swedish behavioural specialist who’s been in the field for almost 20 years. The book explains to the reader the DISC method, created by William Moulton Marston a psychologist who published in his book Emotions of Normal people in 1928. The DISC method simply categorises people into one (most often two) of behavioural groups. These groups can be nicely distinguished by colours, you have your red people, yellow, green and blue. Once you understand these colour groups and the behaviours they show, you can start to understand those who cannot be understood.

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5 things using a Kindle taught me about reading

For the past five months I’ve swapped over from using traditional paper books to a Kindle. I was gifted a Kindle Paperwhite off a family member for Christmas. They’d knew that since being at Uni I was struggling to read as much as I liked due to having to watch my spending far more carefully than when I was home with a job. I could no longer splurge out on a bunch off books.

I’d been debating getting a Kindle for some time, but never got round to it. I felt like I wouldn’t be a proper bookworm if I went over to the dark side and stopped reading physical books as much. But now that I had one I paid no attention to those thoughts and went on reading as mornal.

I never expected anything to change when I switched over to using a Kindle however, within a few weeks I found some odd changes in how I read and my general reading experiences. A few months have passes and I’ve started to read the odd paper book every now and then (usually when I’m borrowing one off a family member) and I found my whole perspective on reading changed. It’s something I wanted to share with you all today as a lot of the time when people talk about Kindles and other forms of eBooks, they’re being compared to your traditional paper books and not being looked at alone. It’s not often people talk about them without trying to sway you either to buy one or to persward you they’re not real books.

Today I’m not going to be doing either of them, instead I’m going to tell you about how using a Kindle taught me about reading.

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Movie adaptions of books – are they good or bad?

I was re-watching the Harry Potter series… again… the other day and couldn’t help but start to compare the films to the books, something I’m sure we’ve all done before. I was on the third movie, The Prisoner of Azkaban what is my favourite book to read in the series, but my least favourite film to watch. I just feel as if way too much important information got left out. This got me thinking about movie adaptions of books as a whole, are they something good or bad?

A common misconception is that I’m an English Literature student. Whist you many find me making myself at home in the odd English Lit lecture, it’s not my degree. My full degree is Creative and Professional Writing. I’m not studying the history of literature, I’m studying how to write in the creative and professional field, it’s quite a unique degree. I do your traditional creative writing, like how to write a book, alongside writing for the professional field, so non-fiction, journalism, game design and screenwriting. Yup, I’m learning how to write films.

I study how to write books and screenplays, this gives me a pretty unique stance on the film adaption of books debate as I work with both regularly. So, what do I think about film adaptions? Well, I have quite a few thoughts on the matter so lets dive right into it.

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Sleeping giants – book review

Wanting a fresh read with a unique structure and exciting twists and turns? Of course you do! This past week I’ve been reading Sleeping Giants by Sylvain Neuvel, it’s a gripping science fiction and thriller read.

The basic outline of the plot (spoiler free!) is that parts of a giant entity have been discovered all around the world after being dormant for thousands of years. This opens up the questions of where did this thing come from? Why was it found separated all over the planet? And most importantly, is the human race ready for what is to come? To start to answer these questions a team is put together by a mysterious character who is the puppet master of the whole operation.

Sleeping giants is written in a structure unlike anything I’ve come across before. The whole book is templated off something that would quite easily resemble a top secret file. Almost all of the book is set out in an interview format between this mystery man and the characters he interacts with. This creates a refreshing and unique reading experience.

World building is kept to an absolute minimum as you learn everything through character dialogue. I can appreciate that those of you who like to read more complex world building may be slightly put off by the idea of this however, I’d really recommend you give this book a chance. You won’t be spoon fed anything and this creates the opportunity for your imagination to run wild.

The book itself is about 320 pages long, so it’s a decent sized read and is book one of the Themis files what is made up of three books. Although it is worth mentioning there are some bonus texts that fit into the series. These aren’t novels, they are more works of flash fiction.

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