Mistakes I made when I outlined my book

Over the past few weeks I’ve been working on getting my book sorted. It’s still very early days but I felt I had a good enough grasp on the plan for it to start creating an outline. For those of you who may not know, and outline is a step-by-step plan of what’s going to happen in your book. It can include your main plot, any subplots, important information, locations of particular scenes and the general timeline your book follows.

Outlining is an integral part of writing a book. Yes, you don’t have to outline, and you can still write a book. However, being completely truthful your books is going to have a lot of plot holes and most likely have a weird pace. What outlining does is it makes you think in detail about your plot and by doing this you can notice any plot holes or discrepancies that may be in your book. Another cool thing about creating one is that it can significantly reduce writer’s block. Just think about it for a second, if you’ve got a plan of what’s going to happen in your book your less likely to run out of ideas because the ideas have already been thought of and wrote down.

Basically, it’s a really good idea, and the more detailed it is the easier it should be for you to write your story (in theory).

This is what I’ve been spending most of my free time on as of late. I completed my outline a few weeks ago and have since moved on to creating character profiles and really getting to know the ins and outs of every character in my book. However, as of the doing this and referring back to my outline I’ve noticed there’s a few things that aren’t quite right and that’s what I’m going to discuss today, the mistakes I made when I outlined my book. Hopefully you can learn from my mistakes and save yourself time and a lot of annoying editing. Continue reading “Mistakes I made when I outlined my book”

Simple writing exercise – Rory’s Story Cubes

If there’s one thing in the writing process I seriously underestimated it would be the importance of warming up before you write. Before university if I was to write something, I would open my laptop, get up a word document and just write. The start of my writing was always a bit clunky; it didn’t flow very well. If anything needed the most editing in my work, I could guarantee you it would be the start. I now understand that was because I didn’t warm up before I wrote anything.

Since being at university I’ve come to realise the importance of being in the right mindset before I write. I’m not talking about making sure I’m relaxed or feeling very motivated, what I’m talking about is making sure the ideas are flowing and I’m warmed up. So far, I’ve been doing this by free writing. I will set a two-minute or five-minute timer on my phone, pick up a pen and write non-stop until the time was up. What this did was let me get most of my clunky writing out of my system before I was working on my manuscript or essay. You don’t have to do this with a pen and paper, it’s just I find it a little bit easier to be less perfect when I’m scribbling down ideas on paper and not typing them.

It’s all been very well and good but over time it’s got a bit boring so when I went back home at Christmas, I found my story cubes and decided to bring them back with me to university.

I’ve had these since I was about 13 and I think they’re so useful. They’re a fantastic way to just have fun thinking of stories and plots. Since I’ve been back at university, I’ve been using these cubes regularly as writing prompts and over time they became my warm up, replacing free writing. What I wanted to share with you all today is how I use these as a professional writer as a method of warming up my writing muscles. I understand they’re designed for children, but I really wouldn’t underestimate them or dismiss them because of the target audience. Continue reading “Simple writing exercise – Rory’s Story Cubes”

Making a familiar place strange

Location: Coffee shop

Look at what people are ordering, do they drink what you’d expect, is there a pattern in what people have? Consider if coffee is worth it or could you have made instant coffee at your flat? Try to describe the smell of the coffee beans, take your time, spend too long finding the right word. Disregard that word, it doesn’t feel right.

Count the seconds of steam that is created with each cup of coffee, or find an odd layer of beauty in the time taken for it to disperse, absorbed into its surroundings. Concentrate on the sound it makes until it becomes white noise.

Watch the staff behind the counters, decipher any habits they may have. Do they reach for a certain appliance in a certain way, do they lean on a certain counter when they’re tired? Carry on watching then. People watch, and if you don’t know how to then this is a great time to learn. Coffee shops are good for that. Start with the person ahead of you. Notice the timing of their pen hitting the table. Tap… tap…tap… then occasionally there’s a pause then tap… tap tap… pause once more. Let yourself imagine what they’re working on. Are they a student? A professor? A member of the public? If they are a student what do you think they’re be studying? Take note of the lighting. The light is to the side of them, it’s not too bright but it casts a shadow. Sometimes a piece of dust floats by, focus on that. The smallest of things can be the most intriguing.  Continue reading “Making a familiar place strange”

Learning to be alone

One of the best decision I made was going to a university that was away from home. In the near by towns to where I grew up there were a few university that weren’t too bad, it would have been a lot easier to enroll with them. But I didn’t, instead I made the decision to travel over the border and swap gloomy England for even gloomier Wales.

I expected the move to be hard, so many people had told me that the first few weeks would be the worst, that I’d be so home sick. But this wasn’t the case for me. Sure, on the first night after I’d said goodbye to my mum and brother I did have a little cry, but after that I took to university life extremely well. There wasn’t this painful transition that I’d be warned about by so many. I loved living alone, I loved having control over what I did that day and if I didn’t want to go out then I didn’t have to (unless I had classes).

I was studying for my dream job, I had amazing flatmates and new friends, I loved it. Loneliness wasn’t something that crossed my mind… until it did.

Continue reading “Learning to be alone”